Authors

Alex Clare
After nearly twenty years of being a committed corporate person, Alex Clare was made redundant. She had always enjoyed writing, studying fiction part-time through the Open University and managing to complete a novel in her commuting time, though no one had ever read it. Now, with lots more time on her hands, there was the opportunity to take writing more seriously. She began to enter competitions and joined a writing group, which encouraged her to try out new genres and styles. After a period focusing on short stories, she wanted to try another novel. Inspiration came from watching Parliament debate the Equal Marriage Act in 2013. Astounded by the intensity of feeling generated, she created a fictional world to explore some of the issues and attitudes. Now working again she is working on her second novel, in her usual place, on a London commuter train. [Read More]


 
Alex Woodcock
Alex Woodcock is uniquely both a stonemason at Exeter Cathedral and an expert on medieval architectural sculpture. [Read More]


 
Annabel Abbs
Annabel Abbs grew up in Bristol, Wales and Sussex, before studying English Literature at the University of East Anglia. Her debut novel, The Joyce Girl, won the 2015 Impress Prize and was longlisted for the 2015 Bath Novel Award and the 2015 Caledonia Novel Award. Her short stories have been long and shortlisted for various awards. She is now completing her second novel, based on the life of Frieda von Richthofen, wife and muse to D.H. Lawrence. [Read More]


 
Anthony Wilson
Anthony Wilson is a poet and author of poetry collections that span a writing career of over 20 years. He is also Subject Leader for Primary PGCE English at the University of Exeter and has published extensively in this field. [Read More]


 
Carol Fenlon
Carol Fenlon wrote and sold short stories and magazine articles for many years before writing Consider The Lilies as part of her PhD thesis at Edge Hill University in Lancashire. Since winning the Impress Novel Prize in 2007 and gaining her doctorate she has become a creative writing tutor, running workshops in Liverpool and Ormskirk. [Read More]


 
Clare Kane
Clare Kane studied Chinese at the University of Oxford. Following this she worked as a financial journalist for Reuters in London and Madrid. She is a Fellow at marketing communications group WPP and currently based in Shanghai, where she writes about culture, travel and Chinese history in her spare time. [Read More]


 
Dan Cohn-Sherbok
Professor Dan Cohn-Sherbok was Professor of Judaism at the University of Wales and is currently Visiting Professor at St Mary’s University College. [Read More]


 
Dawoud El-Alami


 
Edith Sollohub
Edith Sollohub taught herself to type in order to support herself and her sons in their one-room apartment in Paris. She typed some of her account of her life in Russia in snatched moments, and added to these in later life. The manuscript of ‘The Russian Countess’ was left to her youngest son and daughter-in-law after her death in 1965, who lovingly deciphered the handwritten notes, edited the text and unearthed photographs to ensure that her wish – that her memoirs might one day be published – be fulfilled. [Read More]


 
Edmund Bealby-Wright
Edmund Bealby-Wright is a former journalist who has published in the Independent and worked on radio. [Read More]


 
Edward Fisher
Growing up in post-war Britain Edward Fisher was part of the generation of artists and writers that flourished during the freedom and creativity of the time. Fisher studied Fine Art at Camberwell School of Art in the late fifties and it is there that he first became aware by the work of renowned British artist Wallace Slade and, as a consequence, disillusioned with his own artistic ambitions, preferring to swap brush for pen and follow a career as a critic instead. [Read more] [Read More]


 
Elizabeth McLean
Elizabeth McLean spent six years teaching and working in Hanoi. Curiosity and fascination with Vietnamese history and folklore inspired her to write Imagining Vietnam. She now lives and writes in Vancouver, Canada. [Read More]


 
George D. Chryssides
George D. Chryssides is a Christian author and lecturer, who has been involved in interfaith dialogue for several decades. He has written extensively on religious themes, particularly new and minority religions, as well as the Christian faith. He studied in Glasgow and Oxford, and has taught at several British universities, including York St John University, where he is currently Visiting Research Fellow. His recent publications have included Christians in the Twenty-First Century (with Margaret Z. Wilkins, 2011), The Study of Religion (with Ron Geaves, 2 ed., 2013), Jehovah’s Witnesses: Continuity and Change (2016), as well as two other dialogue books co-authored with Dan Cohn-Sherbok and Dawoud El-Alami. He lives in multifaith Walsall; a member of the Church of England, he attends Lichfield Cathedral regularly. [Read More]


 
Giles Ward
Giles Ward’s real job is creative director of his own advertising agency in Devon. He is a qualified graphic designer, accomplished artist and has written for pleasure since the age of ten. [Read More]


 
Harriet Springbett


 
Harry Guest
Harry Guest was born in Penarth in 1932 and educated at Malvern College, Trinity Hall, Cambridge and the Sorbonne where he wrote a thesis on Mallarmé. He taught at schools and universities in France, Japan and the UK before retiring in 1991. [Read More]


 
Helen Steadman
Helen Steadman lives in the foothills of the North Pennines, and she particularly enjoys researching and writing about the history of the north east of England. Following her MA in creative writing at Manchester Met, Helen is now completing a PhD in English at the University of Aberdeen. When she’s not studying or writing, Helen critiques, edits and proofreads other writers’ work, and she is a professional member of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders. [Read More]


 
James Calum Campbell
James Calum Campbell was born in Glasgow. He read Medicine at Edinburgh, and practised in Papua New Guinea, Queensland, and Auckland, where he was Clinical Head of the busiest emergency department in Australasia. He now divides his time between Scotland and New Zealand. [Read More]


 
Jennie Finch
Born in 1955, just in time to have her own ration card, Jennie Finch grew up in Essex, barely beyond the reach of Outer London. Whilst she read from a very early age, she was an average student for most of her youth, coasting through work she found boring and obsessing over anything of interest. [Read More]


 
Jeremy Hinchliff
Jeremy Hinchliff worked as a librarian for twenty years before moving to Greece to write about the debt crisis. Dead Olives is his first novel. He studied Classics at Oxford and Information Management at Thames Valley University. He lives in Somerset and Messinίa. [Read More]


 
Lachlan Plain
Since childhood Lachlan has lived in other worlds, on different plains, navigating them via several mediums – performance, painting and the written word. He won the 2012 Impress Prize for his first book, The Lost Journals of Pedro Piscator and other Tales, an illustrated collection of short stories. [Read More]


 
Lawrence Sail
Lawrence Sail was born in London in 1942 and brought up in Exeter. He read French and German at St John’s College, Oxford, taught for four years in Kenya, then held various teaching posts in England before becoming a freelance writer. [Read More]


 
Luis Muñoz
Luis Muñoz escaped oppression in Chile in the mid-1970s after having been incarcerated and tortured under the Pinochet regime. [Read More]


 
Magdalena McGuire
Magdalena McGuire was born in Poland, grew up in Darwin, and now lives in Melbourne. Her short stories have been published in the UK and Australia by The Big Issue and The Bristol Prize, and by Margaret River Press respectively. She has published widely on human rights topics, including women’s rights and the rights of people with disabilities. She is an avid reader and particularly enjoys reading books about girls who like reading books. [Read More]


 
Nicholas Orme
Canon Professor Nicholas Orme was born in Bristol and read History at Oxford where his teachers included W. G. Hoskins. [Read More]


 
Richard Ellis
Richard Ellis was born in Devon in 1969. Since studying for a Biochemistry degree at the University of Bath he has lived in East Anglia, Scotland, Italy, Devon and the Cotswolds, and has travelled widely. He now resides in the Fens. [Read More]


 
Robert Gibson
Robert Gibson is a retired Professor of French from the University of Kent. He lives and writes in Sidmouth, Devon. [Read More]


 
Roshi Fernando
Roshi Fernando was born in London of Sri Lankan parents. She has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Swansea. [Read More]


 
Saeida Rouass
Saeida Rouass is of Moroccan descent, born and raised in London. She has worked as a Lecturer within the Adult Lifelong Learning sector in London and as a teacher, trainer and education manager in various countries including Tunisia, Egypt, Kuwait, Borneo Malaysia, Ethiopia and the Sultanate of Oman. [Read More]


 
Torsten Schulz
Torsten Schulz was born in East Berlin. He studied film, worked as an editor for the newspaper of the East German civil rights movement, Die Andere, and since 2002 has been Professor of Dramaturgy and Screenwriting at the Film University in Babelsberg. [Read More]


 
Tracey Warr
Tracey Warr is a writer based in Wales and France, and has published novels and books on contemporary art. She was Senior Lecturer, teaching and researching on art history and theory of the 20th and 21st centuries, at Oxford Brookes University, Bauhaus University and Dartington College of Arts. Her first novel, Almodis: The Peaceweaver (Impress, 2011), is set in 11th century France and Spain, and was shortlisted for the Impress Prize for New Fiction and the Rome Film Festival Book Initiative and received a Santander Research Award. Her second historical novel, The Viking Hostage (Impress, 2014), is set in 10th century France and Wales. She received a Literature Wales Writer’s Bursary for work on her new trilogy, Conquest, set in 12th century Wales, England and Normandy. She received an Authors Foundation Award from the Society of Authors for work on a biography of three medieval sisters, entitled Three Female Lords. She is also working on a new historical novel featuring a 12th century female troubadour in Toulouse, and on a future fiction novel set in the debatable territory of a river estuary, between water and land, in the 22nd century. Her writing on contemporary artists has been published by Phaidon, Merrell, Black Dog, Palgrave, Manchester University Press. Her latest art publication is Remote Performances in Nature and Architecture (Ashgate, 2015). She reviews for Times Higher Education, Historical Novels Review and New Welsh Review. [Read More]


 
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